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Picture of Maria Luisa de Cristofaro
by Maria Luisa de Cristofaro - Tuesday, 9 May 2017, 10:12 AM
Anyone in the world
Re: Authentic Learning
by Nellie Deutsch - Monday, 8 May 2017, 8:17 PM

Can you think of authentic learning that can be done in the classroom? 

You may find Jan Herrington's definition and videos on authentic learning of interest

 
Picture of Silvia Pirini Casadei
by Silvia Pirini Casadei - Tuesday, 9 May 2017, 9:20 AM
Anyone in the world
Blogging on Moodle as a Student by SPC
by Silvia Pirini Casadei - Tuesday, 9 May 2017, 11:31 AM

Here you are my two videos:

-

PAY ATTENTION: use the feed!!!

-  

 

They are a bit short because my pc has a lot of problems today sad

[ Modified: Tuesday, 9 May 2017, 9:20 AM ]
 
Picture of anna naddeo
by anna naddeo - Saturday, 1 April 2017, 11:20 AM
Anyone in the world
Re: Today's Webinar
by John Davey - Saturday, 1 April 2017, 3:05 PM

Hi Dr Nellie,

I have noticed that the link shows the Webinar is over. If I have it right the Webinar hasn't started yet so just a minor thing.

I also note that the link to Screencast-O-matic actually links to Slidespeech. The video link to the Screencast-O-matic works fine as does the video. Screencast-O-matic has certainly been improved as you say in the video.

Thanks for the videos,

John

[ Modified: Saturday, 1 April 2017, 11:20 AM ]
 
Picture of Daniela D'Arienzo
by Daniela D'Arienzo - Wednesday, 22 March 2017, 5:50 PM
Anyone in the world
Myself
by rosaria palmieri - Saturday, 18 March 2017, 7:22 PM

Hi everyboody! my name Rosaria Palmieri I am a special need teacher in a upper secondary school in Sarno. Thanks to this course, for the first time I will use clil wau of teaching with my students. I'm very happy!



Re: Myself
by Daniela D'Arienzo - Wednesday, 22 March 2017, 10:49 PM

Hi, I am special teacher and I like the clil because helo my student with the study.



 
Picture of Daniela D'Arienzo
by Daniela D'Arienzo - Wednesday, 22 March 2017, 5:33 PM
Anyone in the world
my reflection
by Daniela D'Arienzo - Wednesday, 22 March 2017, 9:11 AM

I agree



 
Picture of Daniela D'Arienzo
by Daniela D'Arienzo - Wednesday, 22 March 2017, 5:02 AM
Anyone in the world
my reflection
by Daniela D'Arienzo - Wednesday, 22 March 2017, 9:11 AM

I agree



[ Modified: Wednesday, 22 March 2017, 5:02 AM ]
 
Master of Few Resources
by Sheryl McCoy - Tuesday, 21 March 2017, 12:23 AM
Anyone in the world
Storytelling Means Sharing Culture and Language
by Sheryl McCoy - Sunday, 12 February 2017, 9:39 AM

TEFL2 Young Learners Read Books in English – Applicable Research

 

Do young learners begin to speak or read first? By thinking of this question in respect to how children respond to language and social interactions in the first language, the teacher may determine that speaking is the communication skill that comes first, or at least in tandem with reading when they teach English as a Foreign Language to Young Learners.

Of all learners, young children are close enough in age to remember how it was to learn to talk in their first language. They talked with their mother, father, families, friends, and the outside groups like schools. Also, they are JUST learning to read with basic skill in their own language.

Intuitively, the teacher might believe that this is the perfect time to learn to speak and read in English, as well as their first language. Most researchers appear to agree, if the opportunity to learn is based solely on speaking and reading in English. Students will be less confused and learn more effectively.

If you want to think of a common metaphor, “Don’t have two cooks in the kitchen”, one might decide that you don’t mix the two soups together, just make one or the other.

Reading books in English as a foreign language begins with reading wordless books like Tuesday by David Weisner; or the Chicken’s Child or picture books like Enemy Pie as read on Story Line . Why? Simplicity may be the best answer.

The story is so obvious, they can just tell it. They don’t have to read and think, “What is this word? What does it mean? Why did the author pick this word? Am I saying what the author is writing?”

When you share a story from a wordless book, you can just tell the story based on the words the student knows, their prior knowledge. This opportunity “…meets the criteria of:

  • enhancing student enjoyment
  • lower affective filters,
  • authentic and enriched language input, and
  • more inclusionary collaborative classrooms.

The stories appear to enable students to:

  • draw upon their own experiences and to
  • organize information in personalized ways thus better comprehending and retaining information and concepts.

However scholarly discussion and research are needed to better understand benefits for second language learning, interpersonal communication, and cognitive processing…  “ (Fitzgibbon, et al; 1998)

 

References:

Bala, E. (2015). Storytelling in EFL Classes. International Journal of Social Sciences & Educational Studies, 20.

Fitzgibbon, H. B., & Wilhelm, K. H. (1998). Storytelling in ESL/EFL classrooms. TESL reporter31(2), 21-31.

Hsu, T. C. (2015). Telling tales: Using storytelling to teach EFL kindergarten students in Taiwan. International Journal of Research Studies in Education4(4).

Marzuki, Marzuki, Johannes Ananto Prayogo, and Arwijati Wahyudi. "Improving the EFL Learners’ Speaking Ability through Interactive Storytelling." DINAMIKA ILMU 16, no. 1 (2016).



Re: Storytelling Means Sharing Culture and Language
by Nellie Deutsch - Tuesday, 14 February 2017, 5:52 AM

Excellent post, Sheryl. 

Thank you for sharing. 



 
Master of Few Resources
by Sheryl McCoy - Tuesday, 21 March 2017, 12:09 AM
Anyone in the world
Challenges in Teaching English to Young Learners
by Sheryl McCoy - Tuesday, 17 January 2017, 10:39 PM

Week 1: Part 3

 

What are some of the challenges involved in teaching EFL to Young Learners?

 

Challenges are one of the reason we became teachers. We’re risk takers, especially in the realm of thinking and feeling. We take chances every time we interact with students, fellow teachers, administrative staff, parents, and the community. We already KNOW to expect challenges.

 

The best of us are ready. How? Effective teachers have developed an understanding that there may be challenges. They’ve developed a mindful “backpack” of initial responses. This gives them enough time to access or research more information and resources to develop an effective, more permanent framework for teaching within each individual challenge.

 

Effective teachers know that the day they believe every similar challenge should be handled in the same way is the day when they’ll be SURPRISED. Never take anything for granted.

 

Each child is different, as is each situation, so an effective teacher will grow to always know to reassess challenges.

 

Personally, I believe that this process is the most effective way to treat all children in their learning experience, but it must be supported by the entire community.

 

If the community understands and believes in this constructivist model with a differentiated learning focus, it’ll work. They can’t skimp, by giving the opportunity a “lick and a promise”. Instead, the community must support the process with actions and resources.

 

While we all know most of the possible challenges to teaching Young Children English as a Foreign Language. Based on my meta-analysis of the research about learners in general, the young learner must have a supportive learning community that is centered around the child but lead by the teacher.

 

I believe that this pattern has the most opportunity to help young learners succeed in their Learning of English as a Foreign Language.

 

What I’ve listed here are SOME of the overarching challenges that each teacher can turn into a learning opportunity based on my experiences, knowledge base, and the research provided in the resources of the MoodleMOOC TEFLforYL2017, Week 1.

 

  1. SELF-EFFICACY AND PERCEPTIONS of Emotional State is the most critical to success. How the teacher perceives this about themselves  and their students is just as important as the student perceives these ideas about themselves.

 

  1. Vocabulary development within the ranges of researched expectations. Vocabulary development that’s either much higher or lower than expectations can be a challenge. That’s where differentiated learning develops.

 

  1. Social interactions within the child’s team, including the parents or guardians, the administration, peer teachers, the school community, and the larger community.

 

  1. Expectations

    1. High expectations of teacher can counter:

      1. Poor or nonexistent expectations of students, parents, or community.

      2. Are developed through perceptions

    2. Can change

 

  1. Creation and Development of Communities of Practice that work

  2. Quality Teaching and Learning can be a challenge to implement, but this is another opportunity to do some personal research into Dr. William Glasser (Choice Theory) and Dr. Edwards Deming (Deming System of Profound Knowledge) Dr. Frank X. Sutman ( Science Quest: Using Inquiry/Discovery to Enhance Student Learning.)

 

There are many other leading teachers, researchers, and doctors who knew what we know today about teaching, learning, and the challenges of both. I would suggest that you look to psychology BEFORE the birth of Behavioral Psychology. In the USA, that is pre-WWII and some post-WWII. You might want to gather all you can to learn about the moment American Education System almost broke away from the Industrial School Model with the comprehensive “8-Year Study”.

____Kridel, C., & Bullough Jr, R. V. (2012). Stories of the

       eight-year study: Reexamining secondary education in

      America. SUNY Press.



Re: Challenges in Teaching English to Young Learners
by Susan Brodar - Wednesday, 18 January 2017, 2:15 AM

Thank you for your very detailed and interesting reflections.



 
Master of Few Resources
by Sheryl McCoy - Tuesday, 21 March 2017, 12:05 AM
Anyone in the world
Activities in the EFL classroom, Part 2
by Sheryl McCoy - Monday, 16 January 2017, 3:49 PM

WEEK 1 - Part 2: According to the reading material, what does research have to say about activities for young learners in the EFL classroom?

 

Selected Biography from TEFL EVO2017

Cakir, I. (2004). Designing activities for young learners in EFL classrooms. Gazi Üniversitesi Gazi Eğitim Fakültesi Dergisi, 24(3).

 

Robinson, P., Mourão, S., & Kang, N. J. (2016). English learning areas in pre-primary classrooms: an investigation of their effectiveness.

 

Shin, J. K. (2006). Ten helpful ideas for teaching English to young learners. In English Teaching Forum (Vol. 44, No. 2, pp. 2-13).



Abstract from Cakir:

 

“Teaching young learners is quite a hard task for foreign language teachers unless they are equipped with the knowledge appropriate for the subject group. To be able to present the required subject in the classroom adequately, teachers should be able to keep in mind many aspects concerning young learners, such as age, material, interest, level, intelligence, time, and physical conditions in the classroom… etc. Bearing all this in mind, the aim of this article has been to provide necessary information for the EFL teachers so that they can get the utmost feedback from young learners. It is obvious that being knowledgeable in the related field is always of great help to both sides- teachers and learners.

 

Key words: Teaching foreign languages, young learners; activities and games; crucial facts about young learners"

 

 

NOTE: The abstract indicates that it’s very difficult to teach young learners, but the body of  the research paper relates a different story. Cakir writes of a more positive insight into teaching and learning than described in the abstract. After reading the abstract, I prepared to hear about how to overcome obstacles.

 

Instead, Cakir makes the ideas surrounding teaching young learners seem quite possible, even easy. I agree with the latter.

 

If you want to teach anyone of any age group, you must understand students’ learning needs and motivational needs. How to keep their attention and get work completion are high on the list of importance.

 

Structure, strategies, methods, and activities that have proven successful are listed in the body of this report. I liked the categorizations and examples. The charts should be helpful for new learning and review. Most are those I learned from the Effective School Movement.

 

For more information, I would suggest reading Robert Marzano’s various strategy instruction books based on Marzano, et al research into strategies, changing the way we grade, and other important topics. The meta analysis of Instructional Strategies That Work by Marzano and his research team indicated that “Analyzing Similarities and Differences” was the instructional strategy with the biggest “bang for the buck”. Using analogies and other such comparison strategies is an excellent way to improve knowledge, especially in the EFL classroom. Young children love these strategies. They often perceive activities using analogies as “games”. I’ve found it to be a very  successful strategy in teaching vocabulary and ideas.



Re: Activities in the EFL classroom, Part 2
by Nellie Deutsch - Monday, 16 January 2017, 4:26 PM

I enjoyed reading your response, Sheryl. Thank you for sharing Robert Marzano's work with us.  



Re: Activities in the EFL classroom, Part 2
by Sheryl McCoy - Wednesday, 18 January 2017, 11:51 AM

Thanks Nellie! When I taught in Wichita, Kansas, Robert Marzano was advising the district on instructional strategies, administrator walk-about teacher evaluations, and a variety of other research topics.

I met to discuss his work with him a few times, and our school  received direct professional development. I was just one of many team leaders who had this opportunity, so I'm sure he doesn't remember me. I remember him, as his work is considered a direct outcome of the Effective Schools Movement (Ron Edmonds et al)



Re: Activities in the EFL classroom, Part 2
by Sheryl McCoy - Wednesday, 18 January 2017, 11:51 AM

Thanks Nellie! When I taught in Wichita, Kansas, Robert Marzano was advising the district on instructional strategies, administrator walk-about teacher evaluations, and a variety of other research topics.

I met to discuss his work with him a few times, and our school  received direct professional development. I was just one of many team leaders who had this opportunity, so I'm sure he doesn't remember me. I remember him, as his work is considered a direct outcome of the Effective Schools Movement (Ron Edmonds et al)



 
Master of Few Resources
by Sheryl McCoy - Monday, 20 March 2017, 10:54 PM
Anyone in the world
Introduction: Suss It Out!
by Sheryl McCoy - Sunday, 8 January 2017, 5:56 PM

 

Cross Your Fingers

It's tricky to tell a lie, but I'll try. This is the way all Teaching EFL to Young Learners EVO 2017 conference participants introduce themselves.

I hope you figure out the TWO TRUTHS I've shared with you. It's all about teaching to learn and learning to teach. Refresh ourselves from the cold winter in our warm home together.

 

One summer, while I was in college, I worked each evening at Medicalodge, a residence for the elderly, from 11:00 pm to 7:00 am as a nurses' aide. My mother would pick me up after work, and we would travel home on a paved road that went straight to where we lived 10 miles away.

 

One morning, I glanced up, and I saw a medium-sized farm truck carrying and dropping fresh ears of corn. My mother and I tried to get his attention, but he didn't see us.

 

 We worked out a gleaning plan. I would just lean out of the car, when she stopped, and pick up the ears of corn. We gathered enough corn for two meals for seven people. Yes, Mom  did remind me to wear my seat belt.

 

That hot day in July, we were Ruth and Naomi, the ancient gleaners! I always enjoyed those crazy, fun, short moments with my mother. Ask me, and I'll tell you many more gleaning adventures with my mom.

 

One of my favorite vacations  was the one I took along the Colorado River, from Hoover Dam, to Las Vegas, down the Colorado River, through the Grand Canyons. I rode a chartreuse donkey with a red leather saddle to Mexico. Later, I had a chance to see the rare fish called the Humpbacked Chub. That was quite an adventure.

 

In 1990, I attended my first internet supported NSF grant summer project. It was called GENE: Genetic Education Network for Educators. We learned to identify DNA, performed a variety of experiments with yeast as our most common lab creature, learned to use weevils in genetic experiments, and all about Wisconsin FAST  PLANTS ( Ask about bee butts). It was a 6 week workshop. We worked from dawn to dusk to bring new, up-to-date curriculum for our students. It was a wonderful experience. The GENE network continued to be in contact, make conference presentations,  and share throughout the next five years.

 

I don't fib very well, but I've tried. I hope you can figure it out. Enjoy.



Re: Introduction: Suss It Out!
by Nellie Deutsch - Monday, 9 January 2017, 4:01 AM

The stories are great because they motivate us (the students) to read very carefully. So short is not always best. 

It's not really lying It's storytelling.

Thank you for sharing, Sheryl. 



Re: Introduction: Suss It Out!
by Sheryl McCoy - Monday, 9 January 2017, 7:58 PM

Thanks! I did shorten one story and add some crazy parts to the fiction story about "riding a chartreuse donkey with a red saddle all the way to Mexico" Ha! I enjoy this introduction strategy better than others.

 



Re: Introduction: Suss It Out!
by Maria D Bernat - Tuesday, 10 January 2017, 3:13 PM

Hi Sheryl, Great Introduction! Maybe the bit about you riding a chartreuse donkey down to Mexico is a bit suspicious. Am I right? Made me laugh!



Re: Introduction: Suss It Out!
by Nives Torresi - Monday, 16 January 2017, 6:07 AM

Hi Sheryl, thanks for the stories of your adventures and life times. It is very hard to glean the untruth in your very seemingly truths...or at least they all sound very much like a wonderful colourful life!

So let me deduce...

It seems obvious to me that the untruth is either the whole adventure in the Colorado river or at least in part...as the thought of doing over 1,4oo miles on a donkey would be back breaking to say the least or have taken eons to complete. But that you may have seen a Humpback Chub (fish) if anywhere near the Colorado would be a truth even if they are an endangered species. 

fish

All the other stories seem beautifully real, thanks for sharing!

ciao

Nives in the land down under!



Re: Introduction: Suss It Out!
by Sheryl McCoy - Wednesday, 15 February 2017, 1:55 AM

Nives, you're right. I've never been to the Grand Canyon, and I've only rode horses. But, I have seen the Humpback Chub. Thanks for all your help. I look forward to working together again.



Re: Introduction: Suss It Out!
by Sheryl McCoy - Wednesday, 15 February 2017, 1:56 AM

Thanks Nellie, I appreciate your insights.